Shakespeare and Black Atlanta, 1916

This post originally appeared as a blog for the Atlanta Studies Network.   Shakespeare in Black and White: Atlanta, 1916 Justin Shaw   In 2016, like many other cities across the nation and around the globe, Atlanta played host to a year of celebrations commemorating the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare. But ...

A Hard Look at ‘The Magicians’

04. January 2017 On Various Subjects 0
I was going to write a post about my issues with one of my favorite TV shows, The Walking Dead. I just finished binge watching the last several episodes of the current season. But I got sidetracked when I stumbled upon a little new show called The Magicians on SyFy (well, I found it on ...

The Curious Race/Case of Lil’ Wayne

03. November 2016 On Various Subjects 0
[This essay includes some derogatory language that may be unsuitable for some.] This whole Lil’ Wayne situation has got me thinking a lot about the intersection of race and class. Here’s a recap for those who don’t know: Recently, the rapper (and now author) sat down with ABC correspondent Linsey Davis on Nightline for an ...

Beasts of the Southwestern Wild

[I wrote this back in 2013, when I first moved to Houston to begin my Master’s program at UH.]   It’s been seven long months now since I moved into the jungle, at least I think it’s been that long. I don’t know. I’ve lost trackĀ of the time. I wasn’t left here, or sent here, ...

On Disability and Mortality

Disability, in old age, is the one thing that connects us all. It crosses boundaries of race, gender, class, ethnicity, culture, nation, region, belief. As disability is consciously thought of as that which is to be excluded or that which is to be eradicated by means of anti-aging and immortality, disability is also that which ...

Musings on Peter Elbow (and Bartholomae)

02. February 2015 Musings and Thoughts 0
In his response to David Bartholomae’s critique of expressive writing and defense of “academic writing,” Peter Elbow wants to fight against the impulse and tradition of treating certain texts as monuments, pieces behind glass, thus making a syllabus seem like a trip through a museum. Bartholomae would agree. Treating texts as monuments, as such, prevents ...